CMD29: Call for Contribution Colloquium 7

News, Uncategorized
Exploring liquid properties in confined geometry It is a pleasure to announce within the next general conferences of the Division of Condensed Matter of the European Physical Society, CMD29, to be held in Manchester from August 21 to 26, 2022, the minicolloquium "Exploring liquid properties in confined geometries": Confinement or vicinity to a surface can profoundly alter the properties of the liquid which can become completely different from those measured in the bulk. Modern techniques and new theoretical concepts give us today the opportunity to probe and understand non-trivial physical properties identified from the surface interaction to the sub-millimeter scale. The mini-colloquium aims to bring together researchers from various expertise in fluidics, wetting, rheophysics, microfluidics, confinement effects in liquids, interfacial and scaling effects including invited talks, oral and poster contributions. We…
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PhD Defence of Vahid Nasirimarekani

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Vahid defended with great success his PhD thesis, entitled: Open Surface Active and passive Magnetic Digital Microfluidics, co-directed by Prof. Lourdes Basabe-Desmonts and Assoc. Prof. Fernando Benito-Lopez on the 3rd of December. Congratulations Dr.Nasirimarekani!
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MaMi on cover page of ACS Synthetic biology

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MaMi On Cover Page Of ACS Synthetic Biology​ An image from the paper "Light-Powered Reactivation of Flagella and Contraction of Microtubule Networks: Toward Building an Artificial Cell" published by the team from Max Plank Göttingen together with ESR 13 from UPV/EHU has been selected for a cover page of ACS Synthetic Biology. Congratulations to the team!
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Magnetism and applications mini Symposium

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On the 20th of January, 2021 MAMI network has organized an online mini symposium "Magnetism and Applications" for the members of the network and external guests. In total 70 people attended the event. Some of the talks have been recorded and uploaded with the permission of the speakers. Magnetism the felicitous applied science by prof. Michael Coey (Trinity College Dublin) https://youtu.be/70eq1wE8IPg Mighty Minute Magnetic MEMS by Dr. Orphée Cugat (Director of research, G2ELab/CNRS, Grenoble) https://youtu.be/SVpDjq2L3ww Polymer bonded magnets, processing and applications by Dr. Boris Saje (Kolektor group, Slovenia) https://youtu.be/dSuush1-Qa4
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Magnetic fluids and microfluidics: A short review

Blog
AuthorEmma Thomée, PhD candidate at Elvesys emma.thomee@elvesys.com Elvesys SAS, 172 Rue de Charonne 75011 Paris 1. Introduction into magnetic fluids and microfluidics Magnetic manipulation of micro-fluids is an attractive concept. Due to the non-invasive nature of magnetic fields, magnetic particles or magnetic fluids can be manipulated inside a microfluidic channel by external magnets that are not in direct contact with the fluid. Ferrofluids make up a specific class of magnetic fluids. Ferrofluids are stable colloid suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles in a nonmagnetic carrier fluid, and they exhibit both magnetic and fluidic properties. External magnetic fields can be applied to control their fluid motion and their fluidic properties are retained even under the influence of strong magnetic fields. Ferrofluids can move just as single component fluids thorough microchannels of microfluidic devices.…
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New Paper in NANO Letters

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A paper titled 'Helium Ion Microscopy for Reduced Spin Orbit Torque Switching Currents' has come to life as a result of joint efforts of MaMi consortium members (TCD, IPCMS-CNRS, UNISTRA-Herman's lab) and Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden. This work has been done within the project of ESR 8 Jinu Kurian and is yet another stepping stone in elucidating  behaviour under extreme magnetic field gradients.Full text available here
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Actuation concepts for in vivo-like mechanical strain

Blog
Various actuation concepts can be used to generate membrane stretching. Mimicking stretching forces in vitro for cell culture is often required, for example in lung-on-chip tissue culture (breathing), in heart-on-chip models (heartbeat) or gut-on-chip (peristaltic intestine movement). We will briefly outline the most common and promising principles, including pneumatic actuation, electromagnetic actuation, piezoelectric actuation and dielectrophoretic actuation used in microfluidic organ-on-chip technology. 1. Introduction Cells and tissues in the human body are naturally exposed to different types of mechanical forces. The forces range over multiple length scales. For instance, our bones and cartilage are exposed to compressive loads as we walk and move and our blood vessels are continuously exposed to shear stresses due to vascular flow and to cyclic strain due to blood pressure or lung tissue is under mechanical…
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New Paper in Scientific Reports

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Researchers at the Laboratoire Léon Brillouin (CEA-CNRS), Univ. Paris-Saclay have demonstrated that ordinary liquids can emit a modulated hot and cold thermal signal upon applied mechanical shear wave (Figure below). It tells that the mechanical energy is not dissipated but converted in local thermodynamic states. Prof. Laurence Noirez together with her student Eni Kume (ESR 5) thus identified the equivalent of the thermo-elasticity which was known in solids only.These experimental advances are utmost important for liquid theories and microfluidics, and open the way to a new generation of energy-efficient temperature converters. View the article By applying a low frequency shear mechanical stimulus (~ Hz), the liquid emits a modulated thermal signal synchronous with the stimulus. Real-time mapping of the temperature variation of the PPG-4000 confined in a 240 µm gap (gap view) excited by…
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New Paper in Nature

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The team successfully imaged water flow imbedded in ferrofluid enclosure, stabilized by magnetic forces. X-ray tomography 3D imaging was performed at PSI synchrotron (CH), in a new collaboration, which validated the full shape of the microfluidic circuitry, as well as the accuracy of the optical method used IPCMS laboratory in parallel. The team is now capable of stabilizing and imaging tubes of 15 microns diameter, more than one order of magnitude smaller than before. This finding a key for showing how this approach is relevant for the field of microfluidics, in particular for flowing very viscous liquids or very delicate biological compounds. These results are published in latest issue in Nature Dunne, P., Adachi, T., Dev, A.A. et al. Liquid flow and control without solid walls. Nature 581, 58–62 (2020).…
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